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    The World of Plants and Climate Change

    The World of Plants and Climate Change

    The World of Plants and Climate Change

    Our small exhibition presents evidences for global climatic changes that Earth has experienced in the last 65 million years. Fossils all around the world indicate that between 58 – 50 million years ago (late Paleocene – early Eocene) the ocean and atmosphere temperature were much higher than today. This climate episode is known as the PETM –Paleocene/Eocene Thermal Maximum. We present fossil plant remains from that period. The visitors can observe such specimens as leaf impressions and fragment of wood from Eocene of Geiseltal (Germany), a fruit of the nipa palm (Nypa burtini) from Eocene found in Schaarbreek (Belgium). Particularly interesting are leaf impressions from Chłabówka (Poland, southern part of Podhale region at the foot of the Tatra Mountains). Even those few presented fossils show clearly that most of the European continent was dominated in Eocene by evergreen, lush subtropical or even paratropical vegetation. The mean annual temperature could have reached up to 20°C! (now it is 8°C in Poland).

    Visitors to the Museum can also admire leaf impressions from Paleogene of the Spitsbergen and the Antarctic Peninsula. Fossils from the polar regions emphasise even more clearly the scale of the Paleocene/Eocene global warming and provide evidence that cold and barren high-latitude areas were once covered by temperate forests.

    Museum of the Earth Archival Treasury

    Museum of the Earth Archival Treasury

    The exhibition presents selected collection of objects related to important anniversaries and events (e.g. illustrating Poland’s Antarctic research tradition with regard to the International Polar Year).

    History of Geology

    History of Geology

    The exhibit stand mainly presents documents on the history of geology. It chronicles the origins of Earth sciences in Poland and in the world. The exhibition is complemented by attractive exhibits collected by the History of Earth Sciences and Library Section.

    Before Coal was Formed

    Before Coal was Formed

    The exhibition presents the richness of vegetation from two of the most important carbon geologic periods in the Earth’s history: Carboniferous and Neogene. It presents reconstructions of various plant communities accomplished based upon fossils found in sediments accompanying bituminous (black) coal deposits (Carboniferous) and brown coal (lignite) (Neogene). The fossil plant specimens originate from the Upper and Lower Silesian coal deposits as well as brown coal mines in Turoszów, Konin and Bełchatów and from the site in Dobrzyń nad Wisłą town.

    Our exhibition also intends to remind the visitors that coal is not only the basic energy source in Poland, but also that it is an interesting sedimentary rock of plant origin.

    Amber – Poland and the World

    Amber – Poland and the World

    We proudly present the ninth permanent exhibition dedicated to amber in the premises of the Polish Academy of Sciences Museum of the Earth. This time, attention was paid to the distribution of amber and other fossil resins in Poland and in the world. Apart from specimens illustrating the richness of amber varieties and remarkable world of inclusions (animal and plant), we also present research interpretations on the genesis of amber and reconstruction of the amber forest. By means of raw materials from Sambia (Russia), Ukraine and Bitterfeld (Germany) as well as secondary deposits of the Baltic Sea shoreline, it has been identified where amber deposits were made at least 40 million years ago, where it can be found in Poland and why exactly there.

    The section dedicated to the use of amber presents variety of its types, amber processing techniques and products related to folk medicine and traditional beliefs. A special component of the exhibition are fossil resins from all over the world (different from Baltic amber), which nowhere else in Poland – apart from the Museum of the Earth – can be admired in such diversity.

    Meteorites – Stones from the Sky

    Meteorites – Stones from the Sky

    Meteorites have always been of particular interest. Traces of fascination with the mysterious “stones from the sky” can be found in the oldest manuscripts. Collection of meteorites presented at our exhibition was gathered by the Museum of the Earth Society before World War II. The newest specimens come from recent years. At the exhibition, Polish meteorites (including the unique collection of Pułtusk and Łowicz meteorites) deserve special attention. In addition to objects from the asteroid belt, we also present very rare meteorites originating from the Moon and Mars. The exhibition of meteorites collections gathered in the Polish Academy of Sciences Museum of the Earth creates an extraordinary opportunity to meet exceptional “guests from the space”.

    Stone in Human Life

    Stone in Human Life

    Stone has accompanied us since the dawn of mankind. Initially, it was a material for creating simple tools. With the development of humanity, its use has changed to such extent that many ultra-modern technologies cannot be refined without mineral resources.

    The exhibition presents a rich collection of rocks and minerals accompanying the everyday human life, both today and in the past. An overview of minerals with diverse application was supplemented by information on their properties, legends related to them and commonly used imitations.

    Finance and Accounting Section

    Finance and Accounting Section

    Polish Academy of Sciences Museum of the Earth in Warsaw

    Al. Na Skarpie 20/26, 27

    00-488 Warsaw

    Poland

    phone/fax: 48 (22) 629 74 97

    email: sekretariat@mz.pan.pl

     

    mgr Teresa Szczęsna: tszczesna@mz.pan.pl; w. 202 – Section Head

    mgr Elżbieta Adamska: eadamska@mz.pan.pl; w. 208

    Bogumiła Lewandowska: blewandowska@mz.pan.pl; w. 209

    Administration

    Administration

    Polish Academy of Sciences Museum of the Earth in Warsaw

    Al. Na Skarpie 20/26, 27

    00-488 Warsaw

    Poland

    phone/fax: 48 (22) 629 74 97

    email: sekretariat@mz.pan.pl

     

    mgr Janusz Jaczkowski: jjaczkowski@mz.pan.pl; w. 227 – Section Head

    Monika Tomczyk-Mazurkiewicz: mtomczyk@mz.pan.pl; w. 227

    Bożena Jarząbkiewicz: bjarzabkiewicz@mz.pan.pl; w. 224

    Waldemar Zaleski: w. 219

    Popularization of Geological Sciences Section

    Popularization of Geological Sciences Section

    Polish Academy of Sciences Museum of the Earth in Warsaw

    Al. Na Skarpie 20/26, 27

    00-488 Warsaw

    Poland

    phone/fax: 48 (22) 629 74 97

    email: sekretariat@mz.pan.pl

     

    mgr Bożena Rudnicka: brudnicka@mz.pan.pl; w. 201 – Section Head

    Marek Wierzbicki: w. 222

    dr Ryszard Szczęsny: rszczesny@mz.pan.pl; w. 220

    dr Marcin Ryszkiewicz: mryszkiewicz@mz.pan.pl; w. 218

    mgr Wojciech Macioszczyk: macioszczyk@judo.pl; w. 216

    mgr Karolina Jackowiak: kjackowiak@mz.pan.pl; w. 101

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